Belly - Opening Night

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Belly - Opening Night

Wow. A great show and an incredibly fun opening. Thanks to everyone who came out to soak up the visuals and make it feel like one big party. 

Timelapse of the opening & full statement on the show below: 

Large drawings of flowers stretch from floor to ceiling, interspersed with childlike doodles and rubbery human heads.


The gallery is transformed into something like the space of the mind in remembering or dreaming; a place that flickers in and out of three dimensions and linear time.

 

We might find an insight in the unreal space, but it refuses to be held onto. The feeling of a tangible crystal clear truth evaporates, but the images remain to haunt at a greater truth lost in our waking hours.

 

There’s no boundary box of frame, edges of drawing overlap and scrawls knit together, jumping from one paper surface to another, pink-skinned heads float freely and invert. The work in Belly combines for an aesthetic that feels much like a psychedelia of the self, with visuals that oscillate rapidly between the mental constructions of a child or adult, or out of chronology altogether.

 

It is a reconstructed space of frozen moments, replayed motion and esoteric annotations. As in dreams or memories we try to find the truth, where choices lead to divergent paths, what could have been and still could be, looking for signal among the noise.

 

In our heads the kaleidoscopic potential of imagination unfurls, possibilities for the grand and absurd exploding like shrapnel, our perception of crisp boundaries around the self become perforated and eventually disintegrate.

 

In that dissolution there are sensations of curiosity, terror, joy- but ultimately some sublime beauty: that what we are, and may be, is so much more than what is seen.

 

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Belly

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Belly

Belly

work by Ross Normandin & Roger Buttles

 

Opening Reception: Friday April 7th, 2017, 6:00pm - 8:30pm

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Night of the Hunter

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Night of the Hunter

Night of the Hunter

work by Hilary Irons and Adam Eddy

Both predator and prey have a tendency to develop camouflage that is adapted to their environs. Their very bodies become abstracted reflections; skintight maps of where they live, eat, sleep. Remove the creature from its native land and the once harmonious patterns become garish; clashing with new and unfamiliar patterns. An advantage dissolved into liability, the decorated surface advertises the vulnerable status of an outsider.


The works by Hilary Irons and Adam Eddy share elements of landscape and the markings of beasts and humankind; the titular hunter could be either. Are we hiding from an ominous gaze or afflicted with pareidolia, conjuring patterns and imagining threats where none exist?

Opening Reception: Friday March 3, 2017, 6:00pm - 8:30pm

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